Pikliz – Haitian spicy pickled veggies #Superfood#takethatkimchi

Dear readers, I apologize for not having brought this recipe to your attention before.  One of goals of this blog is share healthy and tasty recipes that elevate your daily cooking.  Pikliz does exactly that – it adds a zingy, spicy, crunchy texture on top of fried foods (such as falafel), rice and sandwiches.  It is a painless way of adding a few more vegetables to almost any dish, which is alwas a good thing.  I also love dill pickles and Korean kimchi, but I find that pikliz is on a whole other level.

Ingredients:

  • A decent size Mason or a recycled and santized jar from the supermarket (I actually use recycled Dill Pickle jars)
  • Thinly sliced or grated cabbage  **  If you grate instead of slice, you are looking to use the larger grater blades that give you you long thin slices and don’t “crush” the vegetables.   Also, I’ve used cabbages of all colors for pikliz – they all work well.  What’s important is the crunch and texture.
  • 1 or 2 large carrots, peeled and thinly sliced or grated.
  • A lesser amount of bell pepper, seeded and thinly sliced (for added color and texture) *** Pro tip/cheat code – if you can find bags of presliced or grated cabbage, carrots, peppers and celery  (meant for salads)in your local supermarket, by all means use this .  If you make as much pikliz as I do, it’s a timesaver..  
  • 1 decent sized onion, thinly sliced (do not grate this)
  • 1 spring onion, thinly sliced (including the green stalk part).
  • 2 to 4 Habanero chiles, cut in half and seeded ** (the Habanero imparts the zingy spice notes so I cut it in half to allow it to do so.  Some people cut it thinly which means you’ll eat the pickled Habenero as well.  Generally speaking, I love lots of spice, but in my opinion the that is not the raison d’etre of pikliz.)
  • A few garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • Kosher salt or larger grain sea salt
  • A pinch of black peppercorns
  • 3 good pungent cloves 
  • 2 to 3 cups of white vinegar ( I find the Heinz variety does the trick)
  • Lime juice (extra points for key limes, but if not, any fresh lime juice will do)

Instructions:

This is a very basic method of pickling which means marinating the sliced vegetables in a salty vinegar acidic solution.  This is a cold picking method but I know people who heat the liquids first with the cloves, peppercorns and salt and it works just a well.  Ideally you should make pikliz at least 3 days before consuming it as this will allow the vinegar solution to meld all of the flavors as well as drive excess water from veggies.

Quantities – I have shied away from citing exact quantities because it really depends on how much pikliz you want to make and how big a jar you are using.  Suffice it to say that the cabbage, carrot, onion and bell pepper make the backbone of this dish, and the other parts play a supporting role.  

Add all of ingredients, save the salt, lime juice and vinegar to your pickling jar.  Now add the salt (at least a few teaspoons, but it shouldn’t be overly salty either), the lime juice and the vinegar until all the veggies are covered by the liquid.  Use a wooden spoon to mix everything together well.  Use the remaining vinegar to “top it up”  a bit more but the vegetables should just be covered by the solution, not swimming in it.

That’s it.  Pikliz should as month in the fridge, at the very least.  At my house, we eat it quite a bit so it doesn’t last long enough for me to test it’s preservation properties.  Enjoy.

Where do you want to live for the rest of your life?

 

I don’t feel old.  Nevertheless, if I was in States I’d probably start receiving mailers from AARP as of next year (I’m in my mid 50s).  Thanks to training in powerlifting for the past 7 years I’m fair stronger now than I was in my 20s or 30s.  I’m not a senior citizen nor will I be one in the near future.  I am, however, smack in the demographic that should be in the “end game” part of retirement planning.

The impact of technology on the work/life balance of modern corporate workers has been dramatic – and Covid-19 has accelerated the process.  There is effectively no barrier from you and your work – and no real or tacit “down time” is allowable.  Corporations obviously know that short term gains will be followed my mid-term burnouts and therefore pay a lot of lip-service to “disconnecting” and “wellness” but this belies their real productivity expectations.  For most corporate workers, the only realistic way to meet current expectations is to work long hours and on weekends.

For all of my career, including the present, I’ve always worked hard and never been hesitant to put in what ever hours are needed.  Recently, however, I reached the “wall” to use a runner’s term.  I cannot literally sustain or “increase” my current pace of work for another 10 or 11 years (if I was to program a traditional North American retirement age).  I’m literally living to work, with some short “family time” and powerlifting training (becoming harder to fit in as we work later and later) breaks thrown in.  Real vacations, where one could actually stop working, have become rare indeed.

I’ve reached an age where many people I knew growing up are passing away on a more regular basis.  Some of them were adults when I was young, but a number of them have been my age or younger.  Given that I started working full-time at age 18, by my calculations I’ve worked approximately 35 years so far.  This, of course, forces one to ask that existential question – what is the purpose of life?  I know the answer isn’t “work to live”.

My current situation:

  • Senior Manager in corporate setting.  Reducing hours or taking a more junior position is not possible.
  • In the country where I live, I’m at the age where employers start to find ways to “off-load” older employees quietly, so chances are I wouldn’t make till 65 even if I wanted to.
  • It goes without saying that employers here do not hire older people for the same reasons above (higher “social” costs than younger staff) so an “end of career” change is not likely.
  • I’ve two children – 1 in university and 1 in high school

Therefore my current goal is stay employed until my youngest is has finished his bachelor’s degree.  The country I have lived in for the past 23 years is a great place, I owe it almost everything.  One thing it is not, however, is cheap to live in.  Therefore, I’ve actively started looking for a country suitable for retirement.  My criteria are the following:

  • Reasonable cost of living (this includes real estate cost as well as reoccuring expenses).  The goal is to be able to live comfortably on a retirement income.
  • A decent infrastructure, political stability and in an area that will be hit less by global warming in the next 20 years (i.e. no beach front property in 3rd world nations).
  • Language – it should be one that I already speak fluently or speak to some degree.  Croatia is flat out great, but realistically I’ll never probably speak the language beyond a rudimentary level.  Ditto Thailand.  I know a lot of English-speaking expats don’t mind living in countries where they don’t speak the language, but that would quite frankly bother me.
  • Culture/Cuisine – Very important…is it a country that, as my kids would say, I “vibe” with?

The countries on my shortlist:

  • France:  this checks all the boxes (provided you avoid the more expensive parts) , I know it very well and it’s the language if I feel most at home in after English.
  • Spain:  Even cheaper than France, love the cuisine and culture.  Very cheap real estate and living costs (save utilities). My Spanish is both rusty and Latin American influenced, so there’d be a learning curve, but it’s almost a plus.  I’d look forward to improving my Spanish.
  • Portugal – As above, only my Portugese in non-existant.  Harder to learn than Spanish by all accounts.  Still, it’s such a cool place I’d consider it provided I spent the first year in intensive Portugese classes.
  • Mexico:  I know what you’re thinking, Mexico is corrupt and has almost entirely taken over by the Cartels.  Vast swathes of the country are flat out dangerous.  Still, there are still pockets (Merida, San Miguel de Allende, etc) that check the boxes above and remain relatively safe.  For how long, though?
  • Italy:  This should tick all of the boxes above and I feel that Italian would be easier to learn than Portugese.  Amazing country, but I’m not sure I want to live there.  However, given the right reasons, I would consider it.

I am currently planning trips to Spain, Portugal and France as soon as travel restrictions are relaxed a bit.  My first order of business if to find a house in good shape that I can buy cash and use a vacation rental to help cover expenses until I retire.  Realistically, this phase might take a least a year.  I don’t anticipate “jumping on a property” right away unless it absolutely meets all my criteria.

I guess it’s interesting that retiring to my “country of origin” is not even on the radar.  I don’t really have a compelling reason to go there.  It’s not particularly cheap unless I want to live in some areas 100s or thousands of miles away from the remaining family and friends I have there…there are a lot of great things about it, sure, but there are a lot downsides too – that are obvious to those of us living outside the country, but less apparent to some living in the country.  I wasn’t born there nor have I spent most of my life there.  If I had to go, so be it, it’s just not my first choice.

I think my situation is only unique in that it’s unusual even now for Americans or Canadians to expatriate or immigrate and even more so for retirees.  Most of the rest of world’s population, this option has always been on the table (if people were given half a chance).  Even now, as I vist Canada and the US and I explain that I live in Europe, I’m often asked “why??” by truly surprised or puzzled people.  I feel this is shifting and will continue to shift as we’ve seen a lot of recent US or Canadians immigrants going back to countries like China, India, Nigeria, Ghana and Mexico as opportunities in those countries grow and as the trade-offs of living the American or Canadian dream become less worth it on the whole.

Question to you my readers:  What country would you consider retiring to and why?  Please put your answer in the comment section below.  

We all need a party-trick – or the fun of cultivating obscure, semi-useless natural talents

Talent is the natural aptitude or skill one has in any given action.  If one is really fortunate, one is able to combine their given talent with their livelihood.  If you have a calling, as the saying goes, you will never “work” a day in your life.  What I’m talking about is something that comes easier to you than it seemingly does to others although one must work hard to refine this talent.  Most of us, if we’ve lived at least semi-full lives, have discovered a number of things we are terrible at,  a smaller collections of things we are middle of the road average at and a very small list of things that, for one reason or another, we kick-ass in.  This post is a celebration of the cultivation of those weird, random talents.

When I was 11 I begged my mother for months to let me take martial arts classes.  It’s not that she didn’t want me to, it’s just that we didn’t have that much money at the time.  Finally, she relented, and we found a suitable dojo/boxing gym.  This place was open 7 nights a week – the first 2 hours for boxing, the 2nd two hours for Shotokan Karate.  I usually went a minimum of 5 days a week and attended both training sessions.  After 10 or 11 months of this the following things became apparent.  I was shitty boxer and at best I was able to attain a level that didn’t provoke outright embarassment in onlookers.  On the other hand, I was better in Karate…and what really distinguished me was my flexibity, speed and kicking ability.  My kicks were well above average, and my hands, even in Karate were, well, meh.  For those of you who are new to martial arts, Shotokan is a Japanese style that is not generally known for flashy kicks.  I , however, lived for such, so this being the early 80s I ordered books (yes, kiddies, no Youtube tutorials) written by well-known Korean Taekwondo practitioners that gave detailed technique breakdowns of many jump-spinning kicks, double jump spinning kicks and the like.  Soon  I started to do tournament sparring and it turns out I was relatively succesful.  I was painfuly shy at this point in my life so nobody at school had the slightest idea what I was doing with my spare time until my tournament results got some very localized media attention.  But perhaps even funnier, of the “party trick” variety, was the reception I got at first in the actual tournaments.  I remember once I destroyed this kid, a black belt, 3 points to 0 with rapid fire high kicks.  As we finished the head judge said “Hey, outstanding job for a yellow belt, you do Taekwondo?”  When I replied “No, Shotokan”, he did a doubletake and laughed.  The thing is, I trained 10 to 14 hours a week on this really obscure (especially at the time) skill that was really only applicable in this very specific setting.  I have never been a skilled fighter, I don’t have the instincts.  What I was very good at, however, was this very specific form of “tag” that is tournament karate sparring.

Another very, nay, extremely unlikely skill that I possess is the benchpress.  If you told me at 18 that one day I’d be that dude in the gym who benchpresses more than everyone else, I’d have laughed my ass off.  Until my mid-40s, I had a slimmer atheletic build.  I’ve always had fairly broad shoulders but otherwise I wasn’t big-boned, hairy chested or, at the time, overly burdened with muscle.  I was, and in some ways remain, the original metrosexual.  Benchpressing was for Neanderthals.  I was much more focused in my 20s and 30s on my 10K times than powerlifting.  Fast forward 2 decades in time and almost 8 years of Powerlifting training.  My deadlift is pathetic by almost any standard, my squat is respectable when I’m not injured but my bench is another matter.  On any given day in a commercial gym I can probably outbench anyone in the gym, even the heavier guys.  I might not out-bench everybody in a powerlifting gym, but I’ll at least make a good showing for myself.  I don’t grind out my benchpresses, they go up easily, even when I’m very close to my 1RM…until I’m over that limit and it doesn’t move.  I never train to failure and I only fail lifts a couple of times a year.  As my coach asked me the other day, “So what’s it like having this one weird thing you’re really good at?  I bet it doesn’t come up much in cocktail party chat”…

Finally, the last thing I’m weirdly good at is Trivial Pursuit or Jeapordy type games.  My cousin actually had a week long winning streak on Jeapordy program (RIP Alex Trebek) in the 90s so perhaps it’s in the genes.  So much so that I immediatey vibed with with the move Slumdog Millionaire when it came out.  I just happen to know a lot of weird, random facts for a number of weird, random reasons.  I clean up in pub quizzes, as long as it’s general interest and not too (which can happen where I live) UK specific.  I’m always getting the “WTF, how do you know that?!?!” reaction.  What can I say, I guess rampant boredom and no TV growing up had something to do with it…

We all need these party tricks, these obscure skills that maybe don’t garner much public glory but make us feel good about ourselves.  Firstly, because skills or talents are only discovered and developed because you’ve gone out there and tried many things until, lo and behold, here’s this crazy thing that you’re better at than most people.  Secondly, you need to work hard take the skill in question to the next level.  All of the skills I mentioned above were examples applying many hours of hard work to a specific apptitude.